WHY A COOPERATIVE?

 

WHAT IS A COOPERATIVE?

 

According to the International Cooperatives Alliance, a Cooperative is: ”An autonomous association of people who have gathered voluntarily in order to fulfill their needs and reach their economic, social and cultural aspirations by means of a jointly owned and democratically controlled company.”.

 

The meaning of this definition is quite deep, as it clearly expresses a set of ideas that unequivocally identify the true meaning of a Cooperative: autonomy, voluntary association, the need to cover specific needs, the “economic, social and cultural aspirations” concept, the “company” figure and, finally, the “jointly owned” and “democratically controlled” characteristics.

 

A configuration of deep dimensions, which intersection results in a very complex realization space, where a set of values come into play, confronting the subjectivity of the predominant socio-economic system.

 
 

WHAT IS A WORKER COOPERATIVE?

 

A Worker Cooperative’s primary objective is to provide its members with steady work, selling products and providing services to clients, produced by the Associates’ direct effort. Worker Cooperatives mix professionality, flexibility and participation.

 

They represent a company model in which economic and organizational objectives merge with socially responsible ones. This way, an economic growth is attained, based on social equity and equality.

 
 

WHAT IS NOT A COOPERATIVE?

 

Traditionally, the concept of “company” is associated with economic benefit maximization, and this implies competing in a market and managing the company efficiently. Human related conflicts are derived to experts to be treated and solved, and can end up in layoffs. The capital owners make the decisions. Workers perform their tasks, and don’t participate in those decisions. Many times, they find themselves handsomely remunerated, and many other times they don’t.

 

A Cooperative is indeed a company, and as such it must compete in the market and be managed efficiently, while maintaining people in the center of all its processes and decisions. One person, one vote; regardless of their seniority, social capital or experience. The company belongs to everybody. Capital is necessary, but it is there to support the people and the work they do.

 
 


FOR ALL THESE REASONS, THE FOUNDERS UNDERSTOOD THAT A TRUE COOPERATIVE, WELL ORGANIZED, EFFICIENT AND DEMOCRATIC, COULD FULFILL THEIR NEEDS AND ASPIRATIONS.


 
 


TYPES OF COOPERATIVES

 

 
 


OUR FOUNDATION OBJECTIVES

 

In the beginning, a set of general values was defined, a sort of institutional work frame. Some of these values were related to the work done by the Cooperative, while others referred to the Cooperative’s organization, both indoors and towards the environment in which it operates. When it came to the work done by the Associates, the importance of commitment and responsibility was strongly stressed.


# Projects to be undertaken with absolute responsibility, by strict meeting of deadlines, quality in the work done, and the building of long term trust based relations with the clients.

# Be recognized by the seriousness and quality of the work done.

# Predominance of a deep analysis of the technologies and methodologies, in detriment of the imposed trends in the sector.

# Each member of the Cooperative actively participating in the collective construction of a work team.

# All members of the Cooperative must perceive a monthly income that allows them to have a worthy life, and relate to the organization and the work being done.

# Achieve a fair distribution of the earnings inside the Cooperative, based on the work each Associate provides, avoiding the disproportions observed in the rest of the organizations in the market.

# Each member of the organization must participate in the important decisions regarding the Cooperative’s management: 1 associate = 1 vote.

# All the information related to the Cooperative must be of public access and available to all Associates.

# Tecso must develop and implement the necessary mechanisms to articulate the connections with the region (Universities, ONGs, etc.).

# Tecso must participate in the Open Source Software community. This must be done by using open source software, as well as getting involved in open source software development.


 
 


OUR ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS

 

2003 F. VAZQUEZ + L. LAJE + F. LUNA
2004 F. VAZQUEZ + L. LAJE + F. LUNA
2005 F. VAZQUEZ + G. GIRÓ + L. LAJE
2006 F. VAZQUEZ + G. GIRÓ + L. LAJE
2007 F. VAZQUEZ + G. SANSÓ + G. BARRAGUIRRE
2008 F. REPOND + G. GOLDEMBERG + G. BARRAGUIRRE
2009 F. REPOND + C. BECCARIA + G. BARRAGUIRRE
2010 G. GIRÓ + F. VÁZQUEZ + M. BRAMBILLA
2011 G. GIRÓ + F. VÁZQUEZ + F. REPOND
2012 G. GIRÓ + F. VÁZQUEZ + F. REPOND
2013 G. GIRÓ + F. VÁZQUEZ + A. SPINELLI
2014 I. BENITES + G. BARRAGUIRRE + I. SANSEOVICH
2015 I. BENITES + H. FULUGONIO + I. SANSEOVICH
2016 I. BENITES + H. FULUGONIO + I. SANSEOVICH

 


EVOLUTION OF BILLING, ASSOCIATES AND CLIENTS

 

2003 $300.000 4 ASSOCIATES +1 CLIENT
2004 $500.000 10 ASSOCIATES +1 CLIENT
2005 $811.000 22 ASSOCIATES +1 CLIENT
2006 $1.748.000 27 ASSOCIATES +5 CLIENTS
2007 $2.237.000 28 ASSOCIATES +0 CLIENTS
2008 $3.600.000 43 ASSOCIATES +7 CLIENTS
2009 $6.500.000 64 ASSOCIATES +8 CLIENTS
2010 $10.500.000 82 ASSOCIATES +10 CLIENTS
2011 $16.279.000 103 ASSOCIATES +17 CLIENTS
2012 $26.978.000 130 ASSOCIATES +11 CLIENTS
2013 $37.087.000 129 ASSOCIATES +16 CLIENTS
2014 $53.900.000 147 ASSOCIATES +4 CLIENTS
2015 $72.100.000 155 ASSOCIATES +6 CLIENTS